Cat shot in neck, emus run over, animal welfare body calls for help on unsolved cases

His burns were so severe his organs had begun to shut down, and Jack also died later in the day.

The car swerved to stay on track with the emus and mowed them down.

The car swerved to stay on track with the emus and mowed them down.

Photo: RSPCA WA

Earlier this year in March, a video of a group of emus being deliberately run down by a four-wheel-drive on an outback track went viral on the internet.

The video was passed onto the RSPCA, which conducted an investigation into the footage.

Despite a number of leads stemming from the video, the person who shot the video and the location are both yet to be identified.

In the same month seven Rottweiler puppies, around one week old, were found dumped in bushland in Balingup.

Five of the puppies had passed away after being preyed on by birds and other bush predators, but two puppies were found still alive.

The two surviving puppies will be up for adoption shortly, but RSPCA inspectors are still attempting to find who dumped the animals.

A member of the public walking their own dogs discovered the puppies on March 30, and took the two survivors to the Bridgetown kennel.

A member of the public walking their own dogs discovered the puppies on March 30, and took the two survivors to the Bridgetown kennel.

Photo: RSPCA WA

The latest instance of cruelty occurred just last month, when a ginger tabby cat was found with an arrow through the back of his head in Ellenbrook.

It’s understood the arrow could have been in his neck for around two days before he was found, and the wound was infested by maggots.

The cat shot with an arrow in September last year was found on Mussellbrook Trail, about two kilometres away from where Beau was discovered.

The cat shot with an arrow in September last year was found on Mussellbrook Trail, about two kilometres away from where Beau was discovered.

Photo: RSPCA WA

The cat, now named Beau, has made a full recovery and will be up for adoption soon.

RSPCA WA chief inspector Amanda Swift said it was “appalling” the people who committed these acts of cruelty were still free.

“They could, potentially, be harming other innocent animals and thinking they have got away with their crimes, because they haven’t yet been caught,” she said.

“We’re appealing to anybody who knows anything about these cases, even if it seems minor, to report what they know to us so that we can find the people responsible and get justice for the animals subjected to these terrible incidents of cruelty.”

If you have any information relating to any case, contact the RSPCA at 1300 CRUELTY.

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